Tuesday, February 27, 2007

It's not Photoshopped, it's real... pretty clever.

This dude is a 'rap impersonator' and he's pretty good

he impersonates LL Cool J, Snoop Dogg, DMX, and Jay-Z

The 'secret guide' to ordering special fast-food items:

Taco Bell: Everything Taco Bell makes is comprised of a few basic ingredients, so they'll likely make anything they have the stuff for, which is probably pretty much anything they've ever served. Examples to attempt: Cheesy Gordita Crunch, Cheesy Fiesta Potatoes, Encharito.

Wendy's: A tipster tells us, "order a "Grand Slam", It would otherwise be called a Classic Quadruple, were it on the menu." Reader bringafajita suggests trying to get a "Quarter Pound Double Stack with Cheese." FishingCrue tells us to try "Everything" (lettuce and tomato) on a Wendy's Double Stack, sometimes it's even free. If they look at you like you're crazy, tell them there's a button for it. A double stack with everything, add bacon is a decent sandwich for somewhere south of 2 bones."

Chipotle: Chipotle will, like Taco Bell, make anything they have the ingredients for. Unlike Taco Bell, this is an official policy. Some suggestions: Nachos, Quesadilla, Individual Tacos, Taco Salads, Tiny Bean Burritos Using Taco Shells, Fresh Cilantro on Your Tacos, whatever you can think of.

Subway: Subway will still make the "pizza sub," and many other former menu items. Also, they can't sell "broken cookies," so they may give you some for free.

Jamba Juice: Jamba has an entire secret menu of "unhealthy" smoothies named after things that would involve copyright violations were they to be included on the menu. The ones we know of: White Gummi Bear, Red Gummi Bear, Green Gummi Bear, Raspberry Dreamin', Pineapple Dreamin', Sourpatch Kid, Tropical Tango, Pacific Passion, Berry Depressing, Now and Later, Peanut Butter and Jelly, Apple Pie, Fruity Pebbles, Rainbow Sherbet, Strawberry Shortcake, Push Pop, Skittles, Andres' Surprise, and Lemonade Lightnin'.

In-N-Out Burger: Has their "secret" menu posted on their website, but a tipster writes in: "Not only can you get an animal style burger but you can also get animal style fries which are amazing. It's fries piled with onions, cheese and sauce and they come with a fork." In addition, we hear several voices calling from the mist, whispering that the secret menu doesn't stop at 4 x 4., but may, in fact, go on to infinity.

Starbucks: Starbucks will make you absolutely anything you want no matter how insane it is, according to our tipster. "Baristas might try and tell their customers that no, we can't do that with the blenders. This is a lie. Starbucks corporate policy is that the customer is ALWAYS right (even when the request is stupid). If you really insist that you want your iced soy latte blended, the baristas HAVE to do it. If they continue to refuse, ask to speak to a manager and either they'll realize they're about to get in trouble and will fill your request, or the manager will come out and politely tell the barista to make the customer happy.

Absolutely any concoction that you can think of (involving any type of milk, syrup, coffee, etc.) will be made for you. The limits to Starbucks "secret menu" are merely the limits of your imagination. You can even bring supplements from home and ask the barista to please include that in your drink."

Burger King: Try the "mustard whopper," a whopper with mustard rather than mayo, from Reader dwneylonsr, and the "veggie whopper" from VeryFancyBunny, which is just a whopper with the meat omitted. Reader sixtoe suggests attempting to get the "Bull's-Eye BBQ Burger." Source.

Viewer calls-in on 'Ellen' show (it's actually pretty funny)

Quote of the Day, from Britney Spears' first husband

"We used ecstasy at night to party and cocaine during the day to stay awake. Then we would take downers like Valium or Vicodin to come down and rest. Britney stayed up three days straight over New Year. I couldn't keep up. She definitely had a problem with drugs when we were together - and that was three years ago. She has got herself in a cycle which is hard to break."

- Britney Spears' first husband, Jason Alexander

via

Wow, one freakin' huge sink hole in Guatemala;

GUATEMALA CITY, Guatemala -- This is an aerial view of the scene in Guatemala City where a 330-foot-deep sinkhole killed two teenagers and swallowed about a dozen homes early Friday and forced the evacuation of nearly 1,000 people in a crowded city neighborhood. (02/26/07 AP photo)

[banned from TV] Rolling Rock 'man thong commercial'

'Virtual Distance' football, shows # of yards thrown on LCD

via the Discovery Channel store:

"Take your pass to new lengths – and measure your distance – with advanced sensor technology built into this sure-grip football."

  • Sensor accurately determines distance ball is thrown and oversize readout shows distance.
  • Accurate to within 1 yard

'Super-secret' GoogleTV? Here's how to sign-up:

I've signed in like 20 times to my account -- still no luck... [sigh]

Snow day in college = great ideas?

'We love Jesus' chant at game gets students in trouble

Students at Bishop Sullivan Catholic High School will receive sensitivity training as a result of anti-Semitic chants and graffiti during a recent basketball game against rival Norfolk Academy.

Sullivan Principal Dennis W. Price said, "It is important that we work harder at having students leaving here who are tolerant and understand how serious these kinds of things are," he said.

According to Price, Sullivan students exchanged chants with their rivals during the Feb. 2 game at Norfolk Academy. "Then, at some point, our students were chanting, 'We love Jesus,' " he said. "It was obviously in reference to the Jewish population of Norfolk Academy; that's the only way you can take that."

After the game, a large permanent slogan on the gym wall, "Home of the Bulldogs," was found to have been defaced, with "Jew" written below "Bulldogs" in green paint, Price said.

Price, who was at the game, said the wall was behind the seats of Sullivan students. "It's where we were, where our kids were. I don't think anybody else could have done it." he said. "I'd love to be able to tell you otherwise." Full article here.

An open letter to all the Rosie O'Donnell(s)

How not to exit a parking garage.

Don't call them 'midgets', they prefer the phrase 'little people'.

This is an excerpt from an article on sfgate.com:

One of the few groups entertainers can still insult freely is "midgets." I am a person with dwarfism and I get offended every time I hear someone in Hollywood use that word. After Mel Gibson, Michael Richards and Isaiah Washington, calling a person a "midget" is about the last thing anyone in Hollywood has left to apologize for saying.

Midget is a word that is misunderstood by most people. I hear it yelled at me out of car windows, both as an insult to my being short and sometimes as a threat to my safety. It is also frequently heard on television. I'd like to help set the record straight about this annoying, biting word that has followed me around my entire life.

The outcry over bigotry, homophobia and racism during the past six months in Hollywood has been admirable. But why should someone apologize for using the word midget? We must first look at where the word comes from. Midget was created from the combination of the word midge, meaning "small fly" and the suffix -et, so that etymologically the word midget means a "very small small fly."

In 1869, it was used specifically in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel "Oldtown Folks": "Now you know Parson Kendall's a little 'midget' of a man." Stowe is using midget as a way to describe Parson Kendall as an annoying, insignificant man. By 1884, it referred to small people who were exhibited in shows or circuses.

So what is the difference between a dwarf and a midget? In the circus shows of early America, dwarf had a more negative connotation than "midget." According to historian Robert Bogdan, dwarfs were further down the pecking order and were assigned more degrading roles. The terms midget and dwarf had important social meaning in the amusement world. Small people who were well-proportioned -- "perfect humans in miniature" -- in particular coveted the term midget for themselves as a way of disaffiliating from the more physically deformed dwarf exhibits. For midgets to be called a dwarf was an insult. Dwarfs were associated with exotic freak or circus clown roles, and these roles midgets shunned.

But calling someone a midget today is hardly a compliment, and the insults haven't stopped.
In January, on an episode of the NBC show "30 Rock," Tina Fey's character says on her phone, "I just want to go home, watch the midget show and eat a block of cheese."

Unlike T.R. Knight, the "Grey's Anatomy" actor who says, "I've never been called that (a gay slur) to my face," I get called the word midget to my face quite often. The comments usually go something like, "Hey midget!"

I do not see an end to the use of midget. What I hope is that people's understanding evolves so that they realize the word is considered by many little people as a slur on their humanity. It shouldn't be a throwaway line in a comedy routine. It shouldn't be hurled out a car window. And it shouldn't be the only form of insensitivity toward other human beings that doesn't deserve an apology from the Hollywood stars, or ordinary people, who utter it either thoughtlessly or with malice. Article here.